Not knowing how long it would take to get to Nayapul, we left after breakfast sometime mid-morning at a brisk walk. It felt like the fastest pace we’ve set so far, no doubt because it was a thousand meter descent.

Most of the time we walked along a dirt road wide enough for 2 cars abreast. Shortly after leaving, we got our first taxi offer to go down to Pokhara. Another hour later and we hit a small town with buses that were headed to Pokhara. We were psyched up for a day of trekking so we decided to pass on their offers and take the bus from Nayapul.

We followed the valley southward until we were walking alongside the river down below. 4 hours later — our shortest day of trekking — we reached where we began days before and finished the short loop. The national park staff signed us off and we went on our way. We waited for a bus for about an hour by the highway and sought shelter in a small cement structure that was lacking any walls, from the rain that seemed to wait for us to finish hiking before it began.

There were taxis parked by the highway, offering to take us down to Pokhara for 800NPR at first, then for 500NPR. No doubt majority of the trekkers would have taken their offers but I refused to concede. The fare we paid to get to Nayapul was 100NPR but the local bus, when one finally came, charged us 150NPR for the way back. No doubt the busboy padded the price for us foreigners; how thoughtful of him. I wondered how much of it went into his pockets directly and how much of his dishonest efforts he shared with the driver. We were tired and in no mood to argue.

As per usual, the local bus started off packed to the brim of people with sacks of vegetables, boxes of indiscernible goods and baskets of fruits, with an occasional chicken or two. After an hour, passengers alighted and we were able to get some seats. Another sleepy, uneventful hour passed and we were back in Pokhara, eager to check in anywhere for a hot shower and a hot meal.

(Photos to follow)

Leave a Reply